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writing

LIFE Writing life

Me, on the internet

Happy 2019! It’s been so long since I blogged that I’ve come to WordPress only to find the CMS has completely changed. Hopefully this will work out alright…

So, since I last posted, quite a lot has happened. Most significantly, of course, is the fact that my book was finally published. It is officially out there. And the experience has been mildly debilitating, euphoric and plain weird all at once. I am so grateful that it’s been pretty well-received. The reviews have been, on the whole, really lovely. It’s not a conventional thriller (it’s not really a thriller at all, but I’ve ranted about that before), so it’s been really heartening to see most readers have enjoyed it and been surprised by it.

I’m currently knee-deep in book 3, which has been such a different experience from book 2. Book 2, by the way, will be out later this year! It has a title now: Unfollow Me, and you can find out more about it on my website. I really really enjoyed writing Unfollow Me – it was one of those rare experiences when the plot came to me pretty much fully formed, so I just had to write it all down. Book 3, on the other hand, has been a nightmare from the very first paragraph. But I had a break from actual writing (or typing, anyway) over Christmas and spent a long time thinking about it, and I’m hoping that I can wrestle it into some kind of shape in the second draft.

But I digress. The point of this post was really to do a little round up of places I’ve been featured on t’internet since The Rival was published, in case you want to find out a little bit more about it/me/my writing journey. So, without further waffle, here we go:

Why I wrote my debut novel The Rival – The Early Hour

My top 5 books about rivalry – The Big Issue

Best thrillers roundup – The Guardian

Beginners Pluck – The Irish Examiner

My journey to publication – Women Writers

Dark undercurrents of everyday life with Charlotte Duckworth – BritLit Podcast

My top 5 scariest reads – Crime Files

How the Faber Academy course helped renew my faith in writing – We Heart Writing

How I lost and found myself after having a baby – Female First

Three Pics to Publication – Amanda Reynolds blog

Phew! I am sure I have missed some but that will do for now. Before I go though, could I just ask a tiny favour? If you have read The Rival and didn’t hate it, please would you pop a review on Amazon for me? It doesn’t have to be long, but all ratings are so helpful, and I’d really appreciate it. If you have read it and didn’t enjoy it however, I’d really appreciate you, er, not writing one. Cheers. 😉

You can find out more about THE RIVAL on my website, and order here if you want to make my day.

LIFE Writing life

What it really feels like to get a bad review

Goodreads, where writers’ egos go to die

 

It’s happened! I have popped my bad-review cherry. Ugh, I apologise. That’s the worst analogy/metpahor/whatever of all time. But anyway, I have had my first (and second) bad review. They weren’t even that bad, but even so, it was a discombobulating experience. So discombobulating in fact that I thought I might blog about it and share my findings. Because being a writer, writing about stuff helps me deal with it. Obvious but true.

I consider myself relatively thick-skinned – but there is nothing quite like the sensation of someone you’ve never met before telling the world that something you’ve worked really hard on disappointed them. It hurts! It’s also really weird. It feels a little like you’re going along with your day, living your life, and then suddenly a stranger springs out of the bushes and slaps you round the face, and then disappears, leaving you with a sore cheek and a confused frown. It’s a bit like an ambush.

After that first sense of shock and the stinging aftermath, comes your own sense of pride, riding out on a horse called Anger. Your pride then tells you that this person is an idiot, that they’re wrong, that they know nothing etc etc. Your fingers twitch with desperation to type some clever, well-thought-out retort to show them who’s boss. You want to ask them how many books they’ve bloody well written. You want to tell them that the twist was not a twist it was a sodding REVEAL so who cares if they guessed it – they were meant to and it was meant to be satisfying. You want to say that it wasn’t meant to be highbrow literature, so if the prose was workaday then that’s because it’s commercial not literary fiction, and don’t they know anything about the publishing market and genre-expectations?

You would also REALLY like to point out that you wrote and FINISHED your book before The Replacement aired on TV and that you were majorly pissed off when you saw the trailer and realised that if the book got published everyone would think you had nicked the idea.

Then you realise that would make you look like a dick.

(Well, maybe not that last bit about The Replacement. That last bit I would quite like to add to my writing bio. But I will resist and take comfort in this rant instead.)

So you decide to rise above it and get on with your day. But every now and then those choice phrases of criticism (my current favourite is ‘the prose is merely workmanlike’ – how bloody insulting to workmen) creep into your head and slap you round the face again. And you feel a bit sad.

You resolve never to look at your reviews again.

But then… your editor congratulates you on a new 5 star one. So of course you have to go and look. So you do. And you read their lovely feedback and it’s like a warm drink heating you up from inside. And you wish you could reach out through your computer screen and hug the person who loved your book, and tell them how much their kind words mean to you.

And then you remember what your wise novelist friend told you. That a bad review just means the book wasn’t for them. You imagine yourself whispering it to this faceless username who took such great offence at your work that they felt the need to warn others off it.

‘It wasn’t for you and that’s OK. There are plenty of other books out there for you and plenty of other readers out there for me.’

And you go away and write this blog post. And that helps a bit too.

And then when the next bad review comes through, you read it with a better understanding. It still hurts, but a little less.

It wasn’t for you. And that’s OK.

If you’re a fan of ‘workmanlike prose’ you can find out more about THE RIVAL on my website, and pre-order here if you want to make my day.